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Welcome to the Literacy Department page! Here you will find information on our Literacy classes.

Please click on a class to view information about it.

English Classes

ESOL Classes

Reading Classes

English

English 1 through 4

Students will integrate language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, language, and literature in preparation for college and career readiness. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: constructing meaning and analyzing and evaluating the logic and rhetorical strategies used in a variety of grade-level print and digital informational texts; reading and analyzing grade-level print and digital literary texts that represent a variety of genres across cultures and historical periods; using recursive process writing strategies to craft various forms of writing expressing ideas with maturity and complexity appropriate to writer, audience, purpose, and context; listening purposefully to a variety of speakers and messages in both formal and informal contexts; speaking with clarity for a variety of purposes, audiences, and contexts, including formal and informal modes of discourse; understanding and making effective language choices to successfully craft the meaning, style, and tone of oral and written communication at grade-level and/or higher complexity; acquiring an extensive vocabulary through reading, discussion, listening, and directed word study, as well as an understanding of the ways that historical events, culture, and setting influence language; employing a detailed inquiry-based research process, and selecting and using information and communication technologies (ICT) effectively.

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English 1 through 4 Honors

Students will integrate language arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, language, and literature in preparation for college and career readiness. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: constructing meaning and analyzing and evaluating the logic and rhetorical strategies used in a variety of grade-level print and digital informational texts; reading and analyzing grade-level print and digital literary texts that represent a variety of genres across cultures and historical periods; using recursive process writing strategies to craft various forms of writing expressing ideas with maturity and complexity appropriate to writer, audience, purpose, and context; listening purposefully to a variety of speakers and messages in both formal and informal contexts; speaking with clarity for a variety of purposes, audiences, and contexts, including formal and informal modes of discourse; understanding and making effective language choices to successfully craft the meaning, style, and tone of oral and written communication at grade-level and/or higher complexity; acquiring an extensive vocabulary through reading, discussion, listening, and directed word study, as well as an understanding of the ways that historical events, culture, and setting influence language; employing a detailed inquiry-based research process, and selecting and using information and communication technologies (ICT) effectively.

The district shall develop a description of additional requirements and more rigorous expectations, along with a description of higher text complexity to be used for honors-level achievement and learning.

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English 4 College Preparation

Students will incorporate reading and writing study through writing a variety of informative texts using grade-level writing craft and through the in-depth reading and analysis of informational selections in order to develop critical reading and writing skills necessary for success in college courses. This course prepares students for successful completion of Florida college English courses. The benchmarks reflect the Florida Postsecondary Readiness Competencies necessary for entry-level college courses and are also related to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards, the exit standards for Language Arts Florida Standards.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: demonstrating successful reading of argument, including recognizing bias and supporting details; demonstrating successful reading of fact and opinion, including recognizing inferences and main ideas; demonstrating knowledge of a variety of organizational patterns and their relationships in the comprehension of text, including recognizing purpose and tone of informational reading; demonstrating successful understanding of vocabulary in context and through writing effective sentence structures; effectively implementing patterns of paragraph development; recognizing and solving common sentence development problems; reading and modeling mentor essays; and understanding and using language, grammar, and mechanics effectively.

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AP Language and Composition
The Advanced Placement course in English Language and Composition is a college-level study of language and writing.  Students study rhetoric in a variety of genres to analyze how authors use language.  The course emphasizes nonfiction and argumentative writing as preparation for taking the national Advanced Placement exam which many colleges use to award college credits.  Mature writing skills are necessary for success in this course. Return to Top
AP English Literature and Composition

The Advanced Placement course in English Literature and Composition is a college-level study of literature and writing.  Students learn how to use the modes of discourse and to recognize assumptions underlying various rhetorical strategies.  Through reading, discussion, writing, and listening, students engage literary texts through the resources of language, including literary devices.  This course prepares students to take the national Advanced Placement exam which many colleges use to award college credits.

The Advanced Placement course in English Literature and Composition is a college-level study of literature and writing.  Students learn how to use the modes of discourse and to recognize assumptions underlying various rhetorical strategies.  Through reading, discussion, writing, and listening, students engage literary texts through the resources of language, including literary devices.  This course prepares students to take the national Advanced Placement exam which many colleges use to award college credits.

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Journalism 1

This course provides instruction in basic aspects of journalism and workshop experiences in journalistic production.  The content will include instruction in recognizing and writing news for journalistic media and in developing editorials, sports articles, and feature stories.  In addition to written work, students will receive instruction in the history and traditions of journalism as well as workshop experiences in photography, layouts, advertising, printing, and other practical aspects of journalistic enterprise.  In connection with workshop experiences, one or more student journalistic productions may be included.

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Speech 1

This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of formal and informal oral communication.  Major instructional areas will include forms of oral communication, techniques of group discussion, techniques of effective listening, analysis of the audience, and techniques of public speaking.

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Creative Writing 1

This course develops students' writing and language skills needed for individual expression in literary forms.  The content will include instruction in the development and practice of writing a variety of literary works including original poetry, short stories, plays, novels, essays and other nonfiction.  The course may also include technical aspects of publishing students' work in a literary publication.  

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ESOL

English 1-4 through ESOL

The purpose of this course is to enable students who are native speakers of languages other than English to develop proficient listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the English language. Emphasis will be on acquisition of integrated English communication skills in a wide range of content and activities using texts of high complexity to ensure college and career preparation and readiness.

 

General Notes:
The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • active reading of varied texts for what they say explicitly, as well as the logical inferences that can be drawn
  • analysis of literature and informational texts from varied literary periods to examine: 
    • text craft and structure 
    • elements of literature 
    • arguments and claims supported by textual evidence 
    • power and impact of language 
    • influence of history, culture, and setting on language 
    • personal critical and aesthetic response 
  • writing for varied purposes 
    • developing and supporting argumentative claims 
    • crafting coherent, supported informative/expository texts 
    • responding to literature for personal and analytical purposes 
    • writing narratives to develop real or imagined events 
    • writing to sources using text- based evidence and reasoning 
  • effective listening, speaking, and viewing strategies with emphasis on the use of evidence to support or refute a claim in multimedia presentations, class discussions, and extended text discussions 
  • collaboration amongst peers 

 

Special Notes:

Instructional Practices: Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students’ content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any purpose. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning.

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages, as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex. 
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons. 
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments. 
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text. 
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

 

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors.

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Developmental Language Arts through ESOL

The purpose of this course is to enable students who are native speakers of languages other than English instruction enabling students to accelerate the development of reading and writing skills and to strengthen these skills so they are able to successfully read, write, and comprehend grade level text independently. Instruction emphasizes reading comprehension and vocabulary through the use of a variety of literary and informational texts encompassing a broad range of text structures, genres, and levels of complexity. Texts used for instruction focus on a wide range of topics, including content-area information, in order to support students in meeting the knowledge demands of increasingly complex text.

Important note: Reading and writing courses should not be used in place of English language arts courses; reading and writing courses are intended to be used to supplement further study in English language arts.

 

General Notes:

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • active reading of varied texts for what they say explicitly, as well as the logical inferences that can be drawn
  • analysis of literature and informational texts from varied literary periods to examine:
    • text craft and structure
    • elements of literature
    • arguments and claims supported by textual evidence
    • power and impact of language
    • influence of history, culture, and setting on language
    • personal critical and aesthetic response
  • writing for varied purposes
    • developing and supporting argumentative claims
    • crafting coherent, supported informative/expository texts
    • responding to literature for personal and analytical purposes
    • writing narratives to develop real or imagined events
    • writing to sources using text- based evidence and reasoning
  • effective listening, speaking, and viewing strategies with emphasis on the use of evidence to support or refute a claim in multimedia presentations, class discussions, and extended text discussions
  • collaboration amongst peers 

 

Special Notes:

Instructional Practices: Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students’ content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any purpose. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning.

 

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages, as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

 

Additional Notes: Students entering the upper grades who are not reading on grade level have a variety of reading intervention needs. No single program of strategy can be successful in remediating the needs of all students. The reading intervention course should require that students increase the amount and complexity of text they read independently throughout the school year, as these students do not have enough exposure to various text structures and academic vocabulary to develop skills necessary for college and career readiness.

 

It is necessary to implement a combination of research-based programs and strategies that have been proven successful in accelerating the development of reading skills in older readers. The instructional approaches should meet the needs of each student based on results of individual diagnostic assessments and progress monitoring.

Instruction should be explicit and systematic. It should provide direct explanations (modeling) and systematic practice opportunities (guided instruction), as well as carefully managed cumulative review to ensure mastery.

 

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on Return to Top

Reading

Intensive Reading

The purpose of this course is to provide instruction that enables students to accelerate the development of reading and writing skills and to strengthen those skills so they are able to successfully read and write grade level text independently. Instruction emphasizes reading comprehension, writing fluency, and vocabulary study through the use of a variety of literary and informational texts encompassing a broad range of text structures, genres, and levels of complexity. Texts used for instruction focus on a wide range of topics, including content-area information, in order to support students in meeting the knowledge demands of increasingly complex text. Students enrolled in the course will engage in interactive text-based discussion, question generation, and research opportunities. They will write in response to reading and cite evidence when answering text dependent questions orally and in writing. The course provides extensive opportunities for students to collaborate with their peers. Scaffolding is provided as necessary as students engage in reading and writing increasingly complex text and is removed as the reading and writing abilities of students improve over time.

 

The Intensive courses have been designed for the teacher to select and teach only the appropriate standards corresponding to a student’s grade level and/or instructional needs.

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