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Welcome to the Social Studies Department page! Here you will find information on our Social Studies classes.

Please click on a class to view information about it.

History Classes

Government/Economics Classes

Psychology Classes

History

World History

This course provides an understanding of the development of civilization by examining the cultural, dynastic, economic, military, political, religious, scientific, and social events that have affected humanity.  Content to be covered will include the rise of civilization and cultural universals, the development of religious thought, the evolution of political systems, nationalism, the origin of economic systems and philosophies, the influence of major historical figures and events, and contemporary world affairs.

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World History Honors

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the past in terms of the development of humanity.  This is done by analyzing the cultural, dynastic, economic, military, political, religious, scientific, and social events that have shaped and molded humanity.  Content will include geo-historic development; comparative views of history; the origin and development of contrasting civilizations, political theories and philosophies; an analysis of cultural universals; the diversity of economic thought and practices; the influence of major figures and events; and interpretations concerning the historical development of our contemporary world affairs.  Honors courses offer scaffolded learning opportunities for students to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing historical documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, becoming proficient in note-taking, participating in Socratic seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in a capstone and/or extended research-based paper/project (e.g. Social Studies fair, projects for competitive evaluation, or other teacher-directed projects)

 

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AP World History

This course will provide students with an understanding of the major developments of civilizations in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe.  Six overarching themes will be followed:  the patterns and impacts of interaction among societies, the relationship of change and continuity across the historical periods, the impact of technology and demography on people and the environment, systems of social structure among societies, cultural and intellectual developments, and changes in functions and structures of states and in attitudes toward states and political identities, including emergence of the nation-state.

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U.S. History
The grade 9-12 United States History course consists of the following content area strands: United States History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the present day. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events which occurred before the end of Reconstruction. Return to Top
U.S. History Honors
The grade 9-12 United States History course consists of the following content area strands: United States History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the present day. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events which occurred before the end of Reconstruction.  Honors courses offer scaffolded learning opportunities for students to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing historical documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, becoming proficient in note-taking, participating in Socratic seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in a capstone and/or extended research-based paper/project (e.g. Social Studies fair, projects for competitive evaluation, or other teacher-directed projects).  Return to Top
AP U.S. History

Advanced Placement courses require students to successfully perform college-level academic work, including many extensive reading and writing assignments.  This course provides the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems, content, and materials of American historic development.  Higher order thinking skills such as evaluating, analyzing, and problem solving will be emphasized.  Content will include the development of American culture and institutions as well as ideals and characteristics; enlightened thinking and the socioeconomic and political forces and compromises that formed the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence; changing interpretations of the Constitution, and individual rights; sectionalism as a change force; the relationship between technological change and societal reaction; the variety of changing American lifestyles; changes in American foreign policy; the capitalistic free enterprise economic system; and the future of our nation based on current trends.

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AP Human Geography

This course will introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface.  Students will employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.

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Government and Economics

U.S. Government

This course provides students the opportunity to examine their own political behaviors, analyze the dynamics of political issues and practice decision-making skills.  Content will include the nature of political behavior, power acquisition, maintenance and extension; political theorists; comparative political systems; sources, structure and function of American Government; roles of political parties, interest groups and citizens; role of women and diverse cultural groups in the development of our political system. 

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U.S. Government Honors

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of American government and political behavior.  Content will include an evaluation of those documents which shape our political traditions (the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the bill of Rights); the roles and changing nature of political parties and interest groups; the changing nature of citizen rights and responsibilities in a democratic state; and the importance of civic participation in the democratic political process.  Honors courses offer scaffolded learning opportunities for students to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, becoming proficient in note-taking, participating in Socratic seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in a capstone and/or extended research-based paper/project (e.g. Social Studies fair, participatory citizenship project, projects for competitive evaluation, investment portfolio contests, or other teacher-directed projects).

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AP U.S. Government and Politics

Advanced Placement courses require students to successfully perform college-level academic work, including many extensive reading and writing assignments.  The purpose of this course is to give students a critical perspective on politics and government in the United States.  This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case studies.  It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the American political reality.  Specific content to be covered will include an understanding of federalism and the separation of powers, the development of the constitution, the process of politics, the nature of public opinion, the role of political parties and interest groups, the major formal and informal institutional arrangement of powers, and the development of civil liberties and civil rights. 

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Economics with Financial Literacy

This course will provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of both macro and micro economics in order to promote economic and financial literacy.  Content should include, but is not limited to, currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the global market and economy, major economic theories and economists, the roll and influence of the government and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and methodology, financial and investment markets, and the business cycle.

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Economics with Financial Literacy Honors

This course will provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of both macro and micro economics in order to promote economic and financial literacy.  Content should include, but is not limited to, currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the global market and economy, major economic theories and economists, the roll and influence of the government and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and methodology, financial and investment markets, and the business cycle.

 

Honors courses offer scaffolded learning opportunities for students to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, becoming proficient in note-taking, participating in Socratic seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in a capstone and/or extended research-based paper/project (e.g., Social Studies fair, participatory citizenship project, projects for competitive evaluation, investment portfolio contests, or other teacher-directed projects).

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AP Macroeconomics
Advanced Placement courses require students to successfully perform college-level academic work, including many extensive reading and writing assignments.  This course provides students with the opportunity to analyze the functioning of the economy as a whole, including total output and income, level of employment, the level of prices, and the determinants of aggregate supply and demand.  Specific content to be covered will include an understanding of fundamental economic concepts including scarcity, opportunity costs and trade-offs, productivity, economic systems and institutions, exchange, money and interdependence.  Financial Literacy components required by Section 1003.4282, Florida Statutes, have been integrated into this course.   Students will take the corresponding AP exam. Return to Top

Psychology

Psychology 1

This course provides an understanding of human behavior, behavioral interaction, and the development of individuals.  Content will include the theories and methods of study employed by psychologists, human growth and development, self-concept development, adjustment, memory, personality and behavior, emotion and frustration, abnormal behavior, conformity, autonomy, alienation, stress, mental health, and therapy.

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AP Psychology

This course provides an understanding of human behavior, behavioral interaction, and the development of individuals.  Content will include the theories and methods of study employed by psychologists, human growth and development, self-concept development, adjustment, memory, personality and behavior, emotion and frustration, abnormal behavior, conformity, autonomy, alienation, stress, mental health, and therapy.

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